Category Archives: Marketing

8 Steps To Creating A Law Firm Blog That People Want to Read

Thinking of starting a blog on your law firm’s website? That’s great. Not sure where to start? You’ve come to the right place. In this post, we’re going to share eight easy steps to creating a useful and popular blog. Let’s go!

Would you like a list of blog topics to get you started? Subscribe to receive this free resource.

Don’t Speak in Legalese

dont-speak-legaliseImage Courtesy of CT Employment Law Blog

Depositions, adjudications, affidavits, oh my! Unless fellow lawyers are your intended audience, tone down the law speak. Your clients will quickly feel overwhelmed by legal terms that they don’t understand.

Here’s the caveat: you should use it as a relevant keyword initially– somewhere in the first couple of paragraphs in your blog post. Then, define the keyword and break it down so that your audience understands what it means.

Here’s an example:

A prospective client arrives on your blog after searching for the term “expungement dallas, tx.” This person has a fuzzy idea of what expungement means. They only happened upon the term when asking around about removing a youthful indiscretion from their permanent criminal record. Your site needs to educate them on the bare basics of expungement and then provide relevant insight you’d like to include, based on what a prospective client will understand.

Always keep your intended audience in mind. Adjust your conversation accordingly.

Focus on Only a Few Topics

focus-on-onlyfew-tipsImage Courtesy of California Labor and Employment Law

You may be multi-passionate, but you might excel at one specific area of law. This is where you probably focus your practice and where you should also focus your blog.

Instead of trying to be all things to all people, zoom in on the one topic (or handful of topics) that your audience wants to know more about.

How do you determine the best topics to tackle in your law blog?

Consider what your clients or colleagues (depending on your audience) ask you about the most. There has to be recurring questions that you get asked frequently: that’s the place to start. As you fill up your blog with content, people will ask you more questions. Of course, that can also inspire new posts.

The bottom line: start by the answering the questions people ask you most, no matter how basic.

Add Images

add-imagesImage courtesy of China Law Blog

No one wants to look at a wall of text, no matter how engaging. You’ve got to break it up with imagery to keep your audience’s attention. Imagery also helps illustrate ideas and convey your tone– whether it’s funny, pensive, or artsy.

I have a secret source of free images– actually, it’s not secret at all, and of course it’s legal. There are hundreds of amazing stock libraries available with 100% free images to spruce up your site.

All you have to do is visit one of the sites below, save the image you like, and then upload it into the body of your post when you’re ready to add it.

Of course, I’d be remiss if I didn’t add this note: check copyright usage. Most of the images in these stock libraries are under the Creative Commons license, which allows you to use the images for free. Some photographers or websites require a link back (attribution). The usage requirements are always listed, but are subject to change.

So, here are my favorite stock libraries:

  1. Foter
  2. Gratisography
  3. Pixabay
  4. Magdeleine
  5. Unsplash

And if you’re looking for something a little more local, a little more personal, check out Flickr as well. It’s a little murkier when it comes to licensing, but here’s a guide to finding free blog post images for your firm.

Make it More Readable

make-it-more-readableImage Courtesy of Richard Harris Law

Images aren’t the only way to add visual interest to your blog. There’s yet another way to increase the readability of your blog: white space. Instead of lengthy, five-to-seven-sentence paragraphs, chop it up into bite-sized nuggets.

Now, I know this goes against everything you learned in grammar class, but remember this: you’re not writing a dissertation, you’re writing a blog post. Unlike your college professor, website visitors don’t have any incentive to read your entire blog post. If it looks long and tedious, it’s going to get passed up.

Take a look at how I’ve structured this blog, for an example. You may notice that there are no large clumps of text. Most paragraphs are three or four sentences long, but I may throw in a one sentence “paragraph” for emphasis and variety.

Like so.

Breaking up your text in this way makes it easier for visitors to read your content.

Post Frequently

post-frequentlyImage Courtesy of Ohio Employer’s Law Blog

There’s nothing worse than coming to a blog, loving it, and then realizing it hasn’t been updated since 2009. Helloooo… Where did you go? It’s lonely in here.

You don’t want your visitors to feel that way.

Your visitors rely on you to keep your blog current and relevant to their needs. Once you start a blog, commit to regular posting, even if you don’t have many (or any) visitors at first. If you post regularly and follow the other steps in this guide, they will come.

Plus, a regular posting schedule will entice visitors to subscribe to your blog, and return often.

Choose Clever Titles

choose-clever-titlesImage Courtesy of Lowering the Bar

Before people actually read your post, they’re going to read your title. Does it draw them in?

Your title doesn’t need to be packed with keywords to grab attention. Funny phrases, interesting questions, and controversial statements can all engage the reader. Here are a few considerations for a great title:

  • Create a list post (i.e. 10 Reasons Why, 7 Things to Consider…)
  • Create a how-to post (i.e. How to Hire a…, How to Find…)
  • Add a benefit to your post (i.e. Here’s What You Need to Know About X…)
  • Keep it simple but catchy. The reader should be know what the topic is about before clicking.
  • Keep it short. Nothing longer than 60 characters, or under 10 words.

Create Categories

create-categoriesImage Courtesy of Cruise Law News

People come onto your law blog for very specific reasons. Let’s say you have a family law practice. Some visitors may want to learn about adoption, and others about child support. You specialize in both.

To accommodate visitors, create categories that make it easy for them to isolate posts of one topic. They should be able to find more of what they’re looking for by clicking on the category section and selecting a topic.

When you’re creating your blog posts, make sure that you’ve created and then selected specific categories.

Consider creating at least three categories for your blog. If you’re stuck, I’d start out with: advice, opinions, and news.

Be a Source of News

be-a-source-of-newsImage Courtesy of Overlawyered

As a lawyer, it’s your job to stay up-to-date on the most relevant news stories. If you work as an immigration attorney, you’ll probably have an opinion on the current political discourse about refugees.

Bring it on. That’s what a blog is for– it’s a place to add your commentary and unique perspective to the conversation.

Don’t be afraid to insert your take on hot topics.

Would you like a list of blog topics to get you started? Subscribe to receive this free resource.

 

How To Build A Visual Identity For Your Law Firm

It may be unfair and hopelessly shallow, but clients will judge you based on how you look. You know to dress the part in the courtroom, but what about your website and social media presence? Does it look like you: polished, professional, and worthy of a client’s trust?

Be honest. Be brutal. Your clients will be.

A strong brand identity relies on the fine balance of cohesion, presentation, and personality.

There’s a sea of law firms out there that look either out of touch or overly generic. In fact, I’m pretty sure some of these law firms just copy and paste their entire visual identity from other brands. Yikes.

That may be okay (it’s not okay) for fly by night, side-eye worthy amateurs, but not you. You’re the best, and you’ve got to look the best, or no one else will know it, except for me and your mother.

By the end of this post, you’ll learn exactly how to create a visual identity that looks smart, savvy, and purposeful. This visual identity will make your brand more memorable and more trustworthy. Ready to get started? Let’s go!

Psst… Would you like to get 12 tools for creating a stunning visual brand? Subscribe to receive this free resource.

What message would you like to convey?

Here is the best place to start. Would you live to cultivate a friendly persona or an intellectual one? They aren’t mutually exclusive, however you’re looking for the dominant tone in your visual identity.

Perhaps it’s best to think of your ideal client. Are you in family law? Are you an entertainment attorney? Do you work primarily in real estate? Your target clientele shifts depending on what type of law you specialize in. Keeping that client in mind, you can create a brand identity that reaches and relates to them.

How can a law firm that specializes in entertainment be satisfied with a dated and bland visual identity? Or, how can a firm that focuses on family law create a visual identity that’s aloof and unsympathetic?

Actually, it’s easy and a lot of brands do it unintentionally. However, it’s also easy to create a visual identity that deliberately gives off the vibe you wish to present. Let’s take a look at the components that create your visual identity.

The Components of Your Visual Identity:

Color

Color has a profound impact on us. One color can make us feel calm, another can make us feel creative. Studies show that the color called drunk tank pink can actually reduce violent and hostile behavior. There’s little doubt that color influences our psychology.

This is why you need to think about what colors to use in your visual branding. Each color affects us differently. Depending on the message you’d like to convey, use a corresponding color to subtly but effectively echo it.

Here’s a breakdown of each color and how the brain interprets it:

Green – Fresh, Organic, Natural, Eco-friendly, Gentle

Blue – Trustworthy, Secure, Peaceful, Calm, Loyal

Purple – Creative, Unique, Vibrant, Luxurious, Royal

Yellow – Friendly, Excited, Positive, Joyful, Energetic

Orange – Playful, Warm, Cheerful, Social, Confident

Red – Passionate, Bold, Strong, Dynamic, Brave

Pink – Feminine, Sweet, Compassionate, Affectionate, Caring

Brown – Reliable, Approachable, Stable, Dependable, Practical

Gray – Modern, Neutral, Conservative, Futuristic, Advanced

Black – Sophisticated, Traditional, Classic, Powerful, Elegant

White – Pure, Good, Clean, Honest, Open

You’ll probably want a combination of two or three colors to create a unique and intentional visual identity. For example, the color combinations of blue and gray say modern yet trustworthy, while brown and pink say dependable and compassionate.

Do you need help deciding which colors should represent you? Browse the most loved color palettes of all time over at ColourLovers. Pick up inspiration by the user-submitted color palettes and use it to jump-start your brand identity.

Graphics

Graphics are a huge part of visual branding. Along with color, graphics are an immediate way to communicate your brand’s unique identity. This includes images, photos, icons, infographics, and other visual elements.

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to immediately impress your firm’s identity, personality, and tone, you need to intersperse graphical elements into your online content.

On your general website, your blog, and your social media accounts, use graphics to craft a uniquely identifiable visual brand.

When you post an image on your blog or social media accounts, make sure that it:

  • includes your brand logo. In case your image goes viral, you want to leave your calling card.
  • continues the same look and feel as the rest of your brand. Consistency is important for developing a strong visual identity.
  • supports the text if on your blog. Your image should make sense and emphasize the blog post.
  • is high quality. There’s nothing worse than a tiny image that your visitors have to squint to see.

Where to Find Images

Speaking of high quality, there’s no reason to settle for cheesy images when there’s plenty of free and amazing stock libraries on the web. Check out this list of my favorite stock images (and subscribe for even more resources).

Be sure to check the license and usage requirements. Most of these sites require no attribution, but terms can change at any moment.

Logo

Your logo is the best way to instantly impress who you are as a brand. Think of your logo as a first introduction. It can immediately convey the tone and personality of your brand before your client has an opportunity to look at your services, testimonials, or blog posts.

Because your logo represents your brand, don’t go ordinary and buy a template that every other law firm uses. To really stand out, commission an original logo from a reputable logo designer. Find designers, and their portfolios, on Dribbble or Logopond.

Fonts

Last, but not least, is your font choice. Your font says a lot about your brand identity. It can say that you’re fun and hip or serious and staid.
Font libraries like Fontspace and 1001 Fonts let you search for fonts based on the type of mood you’d like to convey. Simply type in “classic” or “modern” to find the perfect font for your brand.

Put it to Work

Now that you’ve been introduced to the four components to your visual identity, it’s time to put it to work on your blog and social media platforms. Here’s how:

Your blog

Be sure to include an image on each and every blog post you write. Not only will it provide visual interest to your post, it will subtly reiterate your brand identity.

Facebook

One in seven people on earth use Facebook. No doubt some of your clients use this popular platform. Take advantage of the cover photo as a prime opportunity to reinforce your brand message.

LinkedIn

With 300 million monthly users, LinkedIn is a powerful marketing tool. Use a professional image here to represent your brand.

Twitter

On Twitter, use the header photo as another opportunity to brand just like on Facebook.

Pinterest

Not on Pinterest? Pins last longer than Facebook posts, and can greatly expand your marketing reach. On Pinterest, use similar cover images to create a consistent visual branding.

Psst… Would you like to get 12 tools for creating a stunning visual brand? Subscribe to receive this free resource.

Final Thoughts

To create a visual identity that mirrors your brand message, remember to ask yourself what your clients need and expect from you. Once you understand what that is, use these tips to build your visual identity.

Don’t forget to download our extra set of recommended tools to help you create a winning visual brand identity for your law firm.

Slow Drip Is Better Than A Big Splash: Consistency Is King

Lately we have received several questions revolving around the difficulty of maintaining a consistent marketing presence without having to spend all day doing marketing instead of client work.

Most attorneys have heard the advice that they need a consistently updated marketing presence, but you’re already busy with your client cases and maintaining the business. Taking time away from the work that pays the bills to “work on marketing” is a tough ask without even considering that most of the time, it’s not always clear what needs to be updated or how often.

Here at AmazeLaw, we’re trying to take the generic guru-ish marketing advice that experts spout like gospel, and deconstruct it to teach attorneys what it really means and how they can use that advice to grow their firm.

The point of this post is to show you what consistency really means and how mastering it can benefit your business. Not only will we tell you what consistency online can do for you but we will also help you to keep up online while you keep up with your busy schedule.

What does it mean to be consistent?

What it means to be consistent varies depending on the activity, but the general goal, is that any time a prospective client stumbles upon your firm, either through your website, a facebook page, a tweet, etc, it needs to look like you’re on top of your marketing.

There are some technical reasons why this is beneficial, but let’s focus on the feels.

As a prospective client of your firm, I want to know that I’m going to be working with someone that I can relate to. Someone that’s on top of the latest trends in the area of my problem. And having marketing that’s up to date checks both of those boxes for me. And as a tip, another signal it sends, is that you’re not an overwhelmed solo. It shows a position of friendly strength. That you can afford to spend time teaching people about your craft because you’re good at what you do and you’re confident in it.

Consistency online helps to build professionalism, clarity, and trust from your viewers while also boosting your google standings. When your viewers are on your pages and you have only updated some of the content or haven’t updated in a really long time it looks as if you don’t care about the details.  As a solo the details can make or break a referral so keeping up online sends a message to your current and potential clients.  Your viewers will respond well to your commitment to be consistent online and take it as a sign that you are willing to commit to their issues and build a bond of trust.

So now you know you have to be consistent but you need to know how consistent do you need to be with each avenue that you have online. Does that mean every day? Every week? Every month? Well, it depends on the activity, so let’s break it down.

Social Media

Putting content on your social media posts can be simple and easy. An original thought everyday. Do you have more than one? Post it! Do you want to promote something more than once? Schedule it! Social media is a way to draw the attention of everyday viewers into things that you are mutually interested in. The idea behind social media is to constantly be grabbing the attention of  people online. Social should be part of your everyday morning routine. Get up, stop at Dunkin Donuts, get to the office, POST.

But it’s easy to say “Do social media every day!” That’s where most gurus stop. We put together a detailed 20-minute daily marketing plan, so check it out and commit to it for just one week.  

Blogging

Ah blogging, ranking second just behind social media for the buzzwordiest marketing advice that never gets into the details.

We’ll cover a simple plan to get you started in a few seconds, but let’s talk about what consistency means when it comes to blogging.

First off, the idea isn’t necessarily to drive a ton of traffic to your site today (though it’s possible and can be a nice side benefit), the idea is to build up your blog like a long-term savings account. And the easiest way to do that, is to make small weekly deposits. Over time your bank account (your website) will grow enough to the point that it has a large number of pages. And just like compounding interest, as a site grows and ages, it’s ability to attract more traffic increases as well.

We recommend weekly blog posts, mostly because it makes it easier to keep up with. Two weeks in between posts and you’ll get out of the groove, and blogging will remain that “activity I’ll get to later when I have lots of free time.” Twice a week can work even better, but we’re also trying to be realistic. It’s hard to set aside that much time every week.

Pick your slow day of the week if you have one. Friday is my favorite. Make a recurring weekly appointment on Friday morning (avoid the afternoon because we all know what happens to tasks relegated for Friday afternoon) to draft a blog post.

I would allocate an hour.  And all you do is spend one hour answering one common question you get from clients in the simplest terms possible. It might feel like you’re giving away your secret sauce. You’re not. The clients that take your info and try to run with it on their own, were never going to be clients anyways. The clients that look at it and say, “Whoah, she knows what she’s talking about and I really don’t have the time or the expertise to handle this on my own” are the clients you’ll love.

Alright, back to it, spend one hour answering one of your common client questions. The headline can be verbatim what clients usually ask, i.e. “How often should I update my will and what should I be looking out for?”

If you’re happy with the post after that hour, go ahead and post it you’re done. If you think it’s a bit rough, put it away and schedule 20 minutes of time on Monday to edit it.  You’ll find that having a weekend for the thoughts to settle in your head can really add to the clarity of your answers.

There’s no rocket science to blogging, and we could go into all sorts of advanced advice, but that plan will make it easy to get started, and could provide you many months of great blog posts.

Email Marketing

There aren’t many firms out there that are using email marketing to their advantage. And in an industry where you’re typically not needed until you’re really really needed, having a medium that puts you in front of prospective clients on an ongoing basis can be key to making sure that you’re top of mind when they do have the need.

We’ll be posting an epic email marketing tutorial soon that will go over all of the how’s and why’s of email marketing, but for the sake of completeness, we recommend that you’re emailing your list anywhere from once to twice a month.  More than that, and it’ll be tough to keep your newsletters stocked with great content, and any less and your list will go stale. Meaning your readers will start ignoring your emails, or perhaps even forget why they’re getting the email in the first place.

Don’t have an email list yet? Don’t worry, we’ll get to that soon. Better yet, sign up for our marketing bootcamp and you’ll get a weekly email that explains the whole process.

Consistency Is The Golden Ticket

It really is. Over time a consistent marketing approach will be out the best marketing campaigns or PPC ads, or TV commercials. So look at your schedule and see where you can add those small marketing nuggets to your daily, weekly, and monthly routine so that you never have to think about what to do next.

And if you need help, sign up for our Marketing Bootcamp,  and we’ll walk you through the basics and turn marketing your firm into a habit.

Lessons In Marketing For Solo And Small Firm Attorneys From A Solo Attorney

Hi, I’m Katie.  I’m an employment attorney.  I like what I do, and I’m good at it.  Oh, you want to hire me?  Great!

If only it was that easy.  I’ve been a solo attorney for a little more than a year and a half.  I’ve learned so much about attorney marketing, especially marketing online.  I know I’ve probably only scratched the surface of everything that I should know, but I’ve made huge strides.  I get calls from other attorneys telling me how much they like my blog.  Clients find me online.  Am I always on the first page of for the search terms I want?  No.  But I’m getting there.

I was lucky that I have a husband who understands all this stuff, but I still had to learn a lot of it myself, and I had to make a ton of mistakes along the way.  If you’re reading this, you might be where I was when I first started.  Let me help you by sharing a few of the lessons I’ve learned.

  • It’s hard and it takes a lot of time.  Sorry.  I know you were looking for lessons that are going to make your life easier, but let’s start with the principle that’s going to carry you through all of your marketing endeavors.  No one teaches you how to do this in law school.  If you started your career at a firm, the firm paid someone else how to do this.  So now not only are you starting a completely new business and lifestyle, but you have to learn another skill.  But that’s okay, because you can do it and there are ways to make it easier, but let’s just all accept that as lawyers, marketing is a skill that does not come easily to most of us.
  • Take time to figure out who you need to reach.  When I first started out on my own, I felt like I needed to get in front of anyone and everyone.  What if I missed out on an opportunity?  I need blogs that reach every audience.  I want to send my email updates out to everyone and their brother (and somehow find a way to be interesting to everyone on that list).  Then I realized that I only have so many hours in the day, and that I need to be efficient, effective, and focused.  Who are your best referral sources?  For me, it’s HR professionals and other attorneys who don’t do employment law, so my marketing efforts need to be specific to those groups.
  • Figure out the best way to reach them.  The people you want to reach may not always keep you top of mind, but your online presence can help with that.  I try to write blog posts and email newsletters that attract HR professionals (day-to-day information that helps them do their job) and other attorneys (legal changes/important cases).  I also only send my email newsletters to people who have expressed interest.  And it works.  I’ve actually gotten emails back from readers thanking me for putting the email together.  How often do you get a mass email and decide that want to thank the author?
  • Find the right tools to help you.  Everytime I write a blog post (shameless plug – it is so easy to do this through AmazeLaw), I make sure to put it out on social media.  I use Hootsuite and autoschedule.  I don’t have to think about the best times to post, and I only have to post once for it to go to Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, and Facebook.  I also use Mailchimp to manage my email lists (more shameless plugging – AmazeLaw integrates with Mailchimp).  Yes, it took a little for me to learn how to use these early on, but now I cannot imagine marketing without them.

I know that I’m not an expert on marketing, but I’m learning and finding a way to make it work for me.  As a solo attorney, I can’t justify spending money on marketing consultants when I know I’m smart enough to figure it out for myself.  I became a solo attorney in part for the flexibility, and I’ve built my firm so that I can make time for marketing because it’s worth the effort.

If you’re looking for more information on marketing, AmazeLaw has a great email marketing bootcamp that you can sign up for at  amazelaw.wpengine.com/#newsletter.  And if you have any questions about your firm’s marketing efforts, you are always free to email me with questions at info@amazelaw.com.  Good luck!

crumpled up law blog

Solo Lawyers Can’t Afford To Be Law Bloggers

You are not a law blogger. Go ahead, say it out loud if you’re not at a coffee shop where people would look at you weird. It’s that important.

So much of the advice bandied about on the internet regarding how attorneys should blog, is for lack of a more-perfect term, crap. It simply doesn’t apply to you as a solo or small-firm attorney. Here’s why.

Law Bloggers use their blog to increase their status and credibility among other lawyers.

When you’re just starting out, this seems like the easy, logical place to start.

After all, you know the law, you can provide deep commentary on the law that other lawyers would appreciate, and that Small Firm Inferiority Complex is a powerful beast that is always thinking of ways to justify to your big-firm brethren that just because you’re small, it doesn’t mean you’re not an expert.

Here’s the thing though. Your clients don’t care. If they were interested in learning the nuances of law, and could understand that deep analysis, they wouldn’t need your help.

They want to know how the nuances of law affect their daily life. How do they solve that one nagging problem that they’ve ended up at your site trying to solve? And can you explain that problem, that pain, to them better than they could explain that pain to themselves. That’s how you win a client’s trust. Not, by being the most vocal fish in a small pond of blogging lawyers, but by doing the legwork to convey true understanding of your clients’ day-to-day problems.

Now, I won’t deny that there’s certainly value in convincing other lawyers that you’re worth a referral, and sometimes it’s valuable to provide a unique insight and circulate it among your peers. But make no mistake about it, writing for lawyers should be considered a rare guilty pleasure, not the focus of your firm’s marketing plan.

Law Bloggers consider their blog to be a separate entity from their firm.

Law bloggers often see their blog as an extension of their personal brand; a sort of hedge against becoming too synonymous with their parent firm lest they decide one day that they want to move on. That’s a great strategy, and I’d recommend that strategy to any associate (or partner) at a big firm.

But you’ve already taken that leap. There’s nothing left to hedge against. Your blog is the marketing arm of your firm, and they should be so intertwined as to be indistinguishable to any potential clients (and Google). Worrying about driving visitors from your blog to your firm website is a fool’s errand. Your blog is your firm website.

What’s more, if you were to separate your firm website from your blog, you’re effectively making sure that none of the SEO value generated by all of that effort is transferred to your firm. Having them both under the same domain is critical to ensuring that your firm and its blog rank well in Google.

Blog posts don’t pay the bills, clients do.

Your blog isn’t about you. It’s about your clients. Everything you do needs to be geared toward their needs, their desires, their pains. Every marketing activity you spend time on need to be focused on one of two things. One, getting more prospective clients to your site. And two, convincing them that you’re so deeply in tune with their problems that they absolutely can’t afford to not contact you for your expertise.

In short, you need to focus on blogging to get business, not being in the business of blogging.

To that end I would strongly recommend looking outside the law industry and into small business marketing for your marketing advice, as your small-firm’s marketing is much more closely related to that of a pool salesman* than a law blogger.

* Marcus comes off a little “marketing-guru” at the beginning, but trust me, you’ll love him by the end. One of the more genuine applications of business blogging I’ve ever seen and a simple framework you can always fall back on when you’re searching for what to write about, or even why you’re bothering at all.

 

Photo Credit: HPUPhotogStudent used under CC
Google Setup Guide

The Ultimate Small Firm Google Setup Guide

Everyone knows Google is the ruler of the roost when it comes to search. In this guide, we’ll take you through the steps to make sure your firm’s Google setup is a firm foundation for the rest of your marketing efforts.

What a lot of small law firms miss out on is the fact that Google provides a number of free tools to help site owners (that’s you) adhere to best practices that can help Google better understand what your content is about. And when you make Google’s job easier, it can only help your prospects of ranking for important search keywords.

We’re going to walk through the setup of each of these tools to make sure you’re taking advantage of all the free stuff.

Your Google Account

First thing’s first. You need to have a Google account. If you use gmail, you’re probably familiar with all of this, but I would highly recommend setting up a separate Google account specifically for your firm. It’ll make things much easier down the road.

If you use Google Apps for your firm’s email, awesome, you already have a Google account, and you can use that email and password to sign in.

If you don’t use Google Apps, you can still create a Google account using your business email address, just use this form.

Google Analytics

Google analytics is a tool that keeps track of who’s visiting your site and when. It’s a very powerful tool that we’ll get into in more detail at a later time, but for now, let’s just get your site set up and verified.

First, log into google analytics by going to http://www.google.com/analytics. Once there, you’re going to create an account by clicking on the “create an account” link in the top right corner.

Google analytics is structured by accounts and then by property. Accounts act as a grouping of websites (properties). For most firms, you’ll only have one property, but if you have a law blog on a separate domain, like blog.myfirm.com, or myfirmblog.blogger.com, you may want to manage multiple sites.

Let’s start by following Google’s instructions for setting up your firm’s account.

Click on the ‘Admin’ link at the top of the page. From here you should be able to create a new account. Fill it out as follows (let’s assume your firm is called AmazeLaw Firm and your website is amazelawfirm.com):

Account Name: AmazeLaw Firm
Website Name: Main Website
Website URL: http://amazelawfirm.com
Industry Category: “Law and Government”
Reporting Timezone: Select your timezone
Data Sharing Settings: It’s ok to leave the defaults here, but for the paranoid, you can uncheck “Anonymously with Google and others” and “Account specialists”.

When you’re ready, click ‘Get Tracking ID’ and accept Google’s Terms & Conditions.

Congratulations, you’re now staring at a rather techy looking page that contains the code you need to add to your website in order to get tracking up and running.

If you use a content management system like WordPress, Drupal, or AmazeLaw, all you need to do is authenticate with Google Analytics and it will suck the code in for you. For example, on WordPress, if you go to Plugins > Add New and search for “Yoast Google Analytics” you can install a plugin that will allow you do suck in your code. There’s even a nifty video over here that will show you exactly how to set it up.

If you use AmazeLaw, just log in and go to your dashboard, there should be a giant button asking you to authenticate. Clicking that will automatically suck in your tracking code.

Now if you don’t use WordPress or AmazeLaw or if you need a developer to add the code for you, here’s a sample email you can send your developer that will instruct them on how to add it to your site. By the way, this should be an amazingly simple task for any competent developer so don’t let them charge you for more than an hour’s time to do it (it’ll likely take less than 10 minutes depending on how they’ve set up your site.)

Hi <Developer’s Name>,
I would like to add google analytics to my site. The following code needs to be added to the <head> tag on every page on my site.
<Copy and Paste the tracking code here>
Thanks!
<Your Name>

That’s it! You can verify whether the tracking is installed by going to Admin > Choosing your account and property, and then .js Tracking Info > Tracking Code. Next to your Tracking ID, you should see “Waiting for Data” or “Tracking Installed”.

Google Webmaster Tools

Google doesn’t provide much direct control when it comes to how your site appears in search, but what little control it does give you is controlled from webmaster tools.

In order to log in to Webmaster Tools, just visit https://www.google.com/webmasters/tools/home. From there, you’ll be able to add your site and verify ownership.

When you log in, if you don’t have any sites set up, you’ll see a welcome video and a simple text field where you can put your domain to add your site. Simply enter your domain, and click ‘Add Site’.

If you followed the steps in the Google Analytics section above your site should already be verified. If not, follow one of the procedures Google outlines in order to verify your ownership of the site. Unfortunately, it may require help from your developer.

Google+ Authorship

Google+ may not be poised to take over Facebook any time soon, but it’s generally accepted that having a Google+ profile set up (if not actively updated) is a best practice for SEO. Google has indicated that going through the process of verifying the authors of content on your site will act as a quality signal in search algorithms. In other words, set up a Google+ account for yourself, and link it to your website.

If your email uses the same domain as your website (it does right!?) then the process is simple. Just log into Google+ using your firm email address and then go to this link and submit your website.

If you don’t have an email address for your domain, something like myfirm@gmail.com or awesomelegalsolutions@hotmail.com, then it requires a bit of effort to get authorship set up, and honestly, your time would be better spent signing up for Google Apps for business and moving your email over there. After all, bill@awesomelegalsolutions.com is a lot more professional than awesomelegalsolutions@hotmail.com.

Google Places

And finally, it’s time to get you on the map. This is absolutely key to making sure your firm is available for Google to list at the top of localized searches. You know, the ones that show a map and a list of 5-10 businesses.

Signing up for Google Places is quick and easy as well. Go to the Google Places signup page and click “Get on Google”.

In the map that appears, search for your business, either using the name or your office address if you have one. If it appears in the search box, click on the business to claim it. If not, just select the “None of these match. Add your business” link at the bottom of the search results to create yours in the system. Now, if you don’t have a Google+ page for your firm, this will go ahead and create the page for you as well.

There are a few fields worth noting when you get to the point that you need to enter your address information. The first is, well, the actual address. Many solo’s don’t actually have a physical office, and even if you do, it’s likely that you want to serve an area larger than the city in which you live. If you don’t have an actual office, enter your home address (you’ll be able to hide the address later). But whether you have an office or not, make sure you check the box that says “I deliver goods and services to my customers at their location.”

And finally for the “Category” field, you could put the general “Legal Services” or if you have a specialty try that. Search along the lines of “Family Law Attorney” or “Employment Attorney” to select your specialty.

Once you have filled out that information, it’s time to let Google know where you operate. If you checked the box above, you’ll be given the option to list out cities, or choose a radius around your office. I would suggest a radius, but that’s entirely up to you. If you want your office to also appear on the map, just check the box “I also serve customers at my business address”.

When that’s done, you’ll be prompted to create a Google+ page for the business and sign Google Terms of Service.

You’ll be asked to verify your business by mail, and you can then go ahead and edit your Google+ business page.

Whew!

That’s it! Take a break. Now you can edit your site knowing that you’re all set with Google.

Was that too much? Want help?

This stuff can get super hard to keep track of. That’s one thing we pride ourselves on here, is our ability to stay on top of best practices on the web, and then building it into our system so that you don’t have to worry about it.

If you want to spend more time being a lawyer, and less time tinkering in HTML…

Sign up for a free trial at amazelaw.wpengine.com

 

Photo Credit: Carlos Luna used under CC

.attorney vs .lawyer vs .com domains. What Should Small Law Firms Do?

There are a couple of new top level domains that are opening up for registration in the next few weeks, and the announcement has attorneys wondering what, if anything, should they do?

What’s the deal?

Well first, let’s talk about what the change is.  Around 2006, ICANN, the governing body for domain names on the internet started taking bids for new generic top level domains (gTLDs).  Since most lucrative and/or useful domains have been taken up by domain squatters and the occasional legit business, folks welcomed the opportunity to get a branded domain name that was relevant to their business.

So, they offered companies and investors the chance to own and manage new top level domains.  Some of them are innocuous (.ceo, .bike, .directory, .beer), some are scandalous (.sexy, .xxx), and some are just industry specific (.plumbing, .attorney, .lawyer).

What makes the .attorney and .lawyer gTLDs interesting, is that they are intended to act like the .gov, .edu, and .mil “sponsored” top level domains.  Sponsored TLDs act as a signal of trust since not just anyone can get one of those domains.  You need to meet a managing body’s criteria. In the former, you need to prove you’re an attorney (or attending an accredited law school), and in the latter, you need to be a government, educational institution or branch of military service.

That’s the theory anyways.

Without going into the threat this imposes on existing ethics regulators (a threat that Carolyn Elefant covers in depth in her post “Should Lawyers Mark A Spot With With a Domain Dot – And Will Ethics Regulators Say Yay or Not?“) it’s important to note that even if regulators embrace the new gTLDs, the real question is whether potential clients will.

I’ve always considered sites with the newer TLDs as somewhat suspect.  It’s not a perfect system, but the fact that you need to pay a decent amount of money for a great .com domain is such a good filter that it tends to cloud my judgement when it comes to trusting other domains.

At least, that’s my bias.  But I’m not one to assume that everyone is like me.  I’m a computer nerd by trade, and as such have a fairly biased opinion when it comes to technology in general.

Enter real data…

Instead, I ran an experiment to find out for real, whether the regulated TLDs accomplish the task of inspiring trust in normal, everyday folk.

Here’s how it worked.  Using Google’s awesome Consumer Surveys tool, I asked a simple question of 100 people.  If you were looking to hire an attorney, based only on the domain name, who would you choose?

  • www.john-smith-law.com
  • www.johnsmith.lawyer
  • www.johnsmith.attorney

The idea for those three is based on the following scenario.  Let’s assume you’re trying to find a domain for your solo firm.  And let’s say you have a fairly common name where you can’t get the exact johnsmith.com or johnsmithlaw.com (because if you can, you should do that right now and stop reading.)

You might then consider, do I get my exact match domain with .attorney or .lawyer instead?  Will that get more clients to trust me?

Well, survey says…

Overall, I was surprised by the results. I thought the .com would absolutely trounce the gTLDs and that appears to be absolutely wrong.

.attorney and .com lead the way.
Turns out, while almost noone prefered the .lawyer domain, .attorney actually appears to hold roughly equal to slightly more trust than .com when you take into account the error margins in the survey.

Here’s the preliminary result:

.lawyer vs .attorney vs. .com trust

Younger folks prefer .com, older folks, .attorney
While that’s the general population, it’s interesting that there are fairly heavy splits when it comes to the age of the recipient. Something that might be useful to know for all your elder law folks out there.

age_split

Upper income clients still prefer .com
If your clients tend to be wealthier, or you hope to get more wealthier clients, it’s interesting to note that upper income individuals still prefer the .com.

Upper income folks seem to prefer .com dmoains ober .attorney and .lawyer

Upper income folks seem to prefer .com dmoains ober .attorney and .lawyer

Want to analyze the data for your target clients?
If you want to comb through the data to see what your target clients might prefer, head on over to the Google survey results page and tinker to your heart’s content.

And if you think this data is bunk, or if you want more info for your own purposes, this survey is set for 100 responses and only cost $10. You can set one up yourself and target the results by geographic region and income, and you’ll have the results in a few days.

I see the data, so what should I do?

Well first, don’t panic. It might seem like there’s a great gold rush out there for these domain names, but the population that uses them is tiny (relative to other TLDs) and an even smaller fraction will actually purchase the domains. And since switching and/or deciding on a domain is a BIG deal, don’t make the decision rashly.

Should I switch to a .attorney domain?
Probably not, definitely not right away, and MOST DEFINITELY, not without some professional help.

There are a number of things to consider when considering a domain switch. You’ll need to consider the cost of replacing any marketing collateral you own like business cards, pamphlets etc.

You’ll need to perform an audit of your existing site to make sure any and all pages on your site are redirected to the new domain properly (for any site with more than 5 pages, seek professional help with this).

You’ll need to update all of your DNS records to match the old domain so things like email will still work… in other words, it’s not as simple as just changing your domain.

Should I register my existing domain with the .attorney and .lawyer TLDs?
If you have $35-$100 burning a hole in your pocket and it would make you feel better to have them just in case, go ahead and buy them. But remember, if you buy both at $35, that’s $70 every single year you own them.

But what if I want to prevent someone else from registering them?
Unless you’re a giant brand with money to spare, this is generally a false worry. First of all, as a small law firm, you’re not big enough for most squatters to care about.

Second, unless the squatter commits to building content in your niche, search engines will never find the squatter’s site anyways.

And thirdly, if you’re concerned about someone coming along and registering a domain just to bad mouth you or your firm, well, the only way to prevent that is to buy up every gTLD out there, and that’s going to cost you a whole lot of money just to prevent a hypothetical.

However… one case where I’d consider squatting is if your firm is hyper personalized and your name is reasonably common. For example, if you own “marystevens.com” or “marystevenslaw.com”, consider picking up “marystevens.attorney” and “marystevens.lawyer” as building a little moat around your personal brand is important when you have a common name.

I am just starting out, should I go .com or .attorney?
Based on the data, it looks like we can rule out .lawyer. And if you can get a decent .com with no dashes, go that route for sure.

But, if you found a really nice .attorney domain in a competitive niche, like say “nydefense.attorney” or “thepersonalinjury.attorney” go for it! Given that it appears that the trust is there, it can’t hurt.

But, one thing to consider is whether having the singular “attorney” or “lawyer” as a domain name will be limiting if you want to grow your firm. The domain seems to imply a single individual, and that might become an issue down the road if you suddenly have a couple of associates or additional partners.

I already registered the domains, if I don’t switch, what should I use them for?
First, redirect them to your existing site by using a CNAME or URL record with your DNS provider. I know that’s really techy, so if you need help, just email me.

Second, if you’re not changing your primary domain, do not use your new domains for things like email or other branding materials. Besides confusing your clients, it also confuses google into thinking there really are two sites and that hurts your SEO.

Should I buy up domains for multiple practice areas?
Not unless you’re creating separate sites for each and have the time to maintain them.

Just owning the domains and pointing them all at your existing site won’t really make a difference for your site traffic. Google will only recognize those domains if you actually have content on them and have links coming in using the new domains. And since it’s highly unlikely that any consumer is going to type “newyorkpersonalinjury.attorney” into their browser bar without some sort of marketing material to prompt them, you won’t get any additional direct traffic either.

But what if I’m squatting, hoping to sell the domains to other attorneys?
Well, sorry to be the one to say it, but you’re the reason we can’t have nice things (like reasonable .com domains.)

That’s it! Any more questions?

If you like this kind of no-nonsense marketing advice for solo and small firm attorneys, sign up for our marketing bootcamp where you’ll get one email every week with easy to digest marketing plans that let you get back to being a lawyer.

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Best Facebook Advertising Agencies 2018

QUICK ANSWER: THE BEST FACEBOOK ADVERTISING AGENCY

  • Voy Media
  • OrionCKB
  • CIBO
  • Lyfe Marketing
  • Sprague Media

Digital advertising is quickly becoming the most important brand awareness tool for small and medium-sized businesses across the globe. But finding the best Facebook advertising agencies to represent your brand isn’t easy, hence this guide! Together we’ll look at how you should go about hiring an agency, as well as recommending five that we think are outstanding.

Facebook Advertising Agency Rankings

RankAgencyLocationMinimum Budget
1Voy MediaNew York, NY$5,000
2OrionCKBWalpole, MA$5,000
3CIBOSan Francisco, CA$5,000
4Lyfe MarketingAtlanta, GA$5,000
5Sprague MediaPortland, OR$5,000

Choosing a Facebook Advertising Agency

While there are some stand-out agencies, no one company is going to be the right fit for every business owner. Instead, it’s important that you learn how to search through the pile to find the perfect agency for you. This search involves weeding out those with red flags and asking the right questions, don’t worry, we’ll show you the ropes!

How to Choose an Agency

Once you’ve decided that you need a Facebook advertising agency to take your marketing to the next level you should find a list of companies to search through. These can either be local or international, depending on whether you think it’s important to have face-to-face contact, or not.

The first thing you’ll want to consider when hiring an agency is any red flags. Perhaps it’s pessimistic, but rather than searching for the benefits of a company; it’s quicker to look for faults and rule those companies out. Obvious red flags include; guaranteed results, bargain prices, lack of contact information, a low-quality website and packages rather than a bespoke approach.

After you’ve pruned the garbage, you’ll be left with a more realistic set of options. From there you can consider factors like their locality, pricing, previous work examples and their responsiveness to your messages. It’s always wise to contact all of the companies to ask for a quote and a prospectus up front so that you’re aware of their typical pricing structure and past work.

Although the cost isn’t the be all and end all, it’s vital that you’re getting value for your money and comparing the quote to their previous work is a fantastic estimate of this potential value. With all the quotes in hand, examples of their previous work and experience communicating with their employees, you’ll be in a great position to decide which agency is right for you and your brand.

Why Should You Hire a Facebook Advertising Agency?

Agencies aren’t the only game in town. After all, it’s possible for you to hire a freelancer or to bring an employee in-house who can manage your Facebook advertising campaigns for you. So, why should you bother to hire an agency?

By managing campaigns for tens or hundreds of different companies at once, an agency has the scale and resources that they need to test extensively and create fantastic images and copy for your ads. What separates one ad manager from another is their data and the way that they can manipulate it to learn from it.

Advertising Guides

Best Facebook Advertising Agencies
Best Instagram Advertising Agencies
Best Twitter Advertising Agencies
Best Snapchat Advertising Agencies
Best Google Ads Advertising Agencies
Best YouTube Advertising Agencies
Best Amazon Marketing Agencies
Best Mobile Advertising Agencies

With thousands of previous campaigns, agencies have millions of data points, giving them a unique insight into the best practices for running Facebook advertising campaigns. This data gives them a head start and can help them to generate better results for you than a freelancer with less experience might be able to.

Do You Need a Huge Budget?

A common misconception among companies looking to scale advertising campaigns is that you need a huge budget to work with an agency and that small and medium-sized businesses can only afford freelancers. The reality couldn’t be further from the truth. Many agencies are willing to work with clients of all budgets; it’s only the biggest outfits that reserve themselves for international brands.

The types of company that would be ideal for an SMB to work with tend to have flexible budget requirements, especially for advertising campaigns that will continue for months or years to come. As long as you’re willing to spend hundreds or thousands, rather than tens, of dollars each month, there’s an agency out there for you.

Facebook Advertising Agency Rankings

Voy Media

Voy Media, founded in 2015 by Kevin Urrutia and Wilson Lin, is a stand-out agency that has successfully managed Facebook advertising campaigns for countless small and medium-sized businesses across the country. As a boutique agency, you get the intimacy that you want, often talking directly to one of the founders who can explain to you what they are doing and why it’s beneficial to your business.

As well as offering Facebook ad campaign management and setup, they also complete audience research consultations for their clients. Voy Media believes in telling a story through your advertising and to do this, they need to understand your audience better, which they can do through detailed and scientific research.

Whether you are interested in Facebook ads, Instagram, retargeting e-commerce visitors or mobile advertising, Voy Media handles it all with their talented team of experienced campaign managers. Unlike many of their competitors, they offer a scaling pricing system based on the amount of money you spend on ads each month, rather than a flat fee.

Working with businesses spending as little as $2,000 each month on advertising, they charge between 10% and 20% of your monthly ad spend per month. Your Voy Media dedicated account manager and the team will work on your Facebook and Instagram ads, as well as audience retargeting, creative creation, copywriting and overall ad strategy.

As far as boutique Facebook advertising campaign agencies go, Voy Media is a stand-out choice because of their reputation for success, diligent attention to detail and fantastic customer service. For small to medium-sized businesses that need a helping hand to take their ad return to the next level, Voy Media is a tremendous choice.

Pros

  • Dedicated account manager
  • No setup fee
  • Full-service Facebook advertising agency
  • Known for getting results

Cons

  • Bi-weekly reporting for most customers
  • Smaller staff

OrionCKB

OrionCKB has been known for years as one of the premier social media advertising agencies for medium and enterprise level businesses who need a hands-off solution for their Facebook and Instagram paid to advertise. Recently acquired by Elite SEM, they are now a powerhouse of search and social media paid to advertise that uses a data-driven approach to generate an outstanding ROI for their customers.

Based out of Massachusetts, OrionCKB is a big agency with a boutique family feel that gives their clients the best of both worlds. After joining forces with Elite SEM they have more resources than ever before, but by acting separately, they still get to employ the focus and determination that has made them famous.

They’ve worked with household names such as Hallmark eCards and Zipcar, which gives you some insight into how powerful their team is and the results that they are capable of. Many of this medium to enterprise companies have in-house advertising teams, but they choose to use OrionCKB as an extension of their staff because they provide stellar results and sophisticated strategy.

OrionCKB has a strict process that they’ve refined over many years of leading the industry forward with new tactics and incredible conversion rates. Starting with strategy, they develop long-term plans that they believe will drive down-funnel KPI’s and show a solid ROI. Their team focuses on placement and ad optimization, ensuring optimum performance.

But they don’t just tweak existing campaigns, they create brand new creatives and copy that they can use to test new ad types without your design team having to lift a finger. After all the hard work is done they present their clients with a deep analysis including trends to test and optimize against, rather than a bland report that offers little to you or your team.

Pros

  • Extensive resources at their disposal
  • Dedicated and experienced team
  • Constantly testing new ideas
  • Focused on KPI’s and ROI

Cons

  • Part of a larger corporate brand
  • Work primarily with larger clients

CIBO

CIBO is an integrated brand experience agency that believes in the game-changing power than a brand experience can have on a customer. Rather than working solely on paid advertising campaigns, CIBO is a complete agency that has worked with some of the biggest names in the world including Subaru, Anki, Commonwealth Bank of Australia and Tesla.

They believe that digital marketing today is very different to how it was in the nineties and even the early two thousand’s. Rather than focusing on simple messages in huge quantities, they believe in guiding customers through a brand experience from their first awareness event through multiple purchases and even sharing the brand with their friends.

Working with enterprise level clients in every industry imaginable, CIBO has a broad range of experience in optimizing online advertising campaigns for direct ROI as well as overall brand awareness, reputation, and impact. For many enterprise clients, the gold isn’t in direct conversions, it’s in spreading awareness or altering their reputation even among those who may never be customers, but whom may speak to others who could become customers.

Pros

  • Very experienced team
  • Full brand experience agency
  • Work with leading brands
  • Huge amounts of data

Cons

  • Not specialized in Facebook advertising
  • Less focus on direct conversions

Lyfe Marketing

Lyfe Marketing is a boutique social media management company focused on offering social media advertising, search engine optimization and website design services. Working primarily with small and medium-sized businesses in the United States, Lyfe recognizes that ROI is vital for their clients who have little interest in brand awareness and more focus on generating direct revenue.

Their social media advertising services allow their customers to leverage the most cost-effective advertising method available today and with a specialized team, they can deliver tangible results. Their work involves optimizing existing campaigns for decreased cost and increased conversion rates, as well as creating new ads which could potentially deliver superior results or bring in new clients.

As a relatively small and niche agency, they have the flexibility to work closely with their customers to provide bespoke solutions to complex problems. With an experienced social media manager dedicated to an account, Lyfe Marketing gets a greater insight into what makes your audience tick.

Pros

  • Bespoke solutions
  • Flexible and small team
  • Focused on tangible results
  • Specialized in social media

Cons

  • Lack the resources of larger agencies
  • Setup fees

Sprague Media

Sprague Media is a comparatively tiny agency that works with niche players in small and medium-sized markets, but their small size is more than made up for by their versatility, speed of execution and flexibility. While working with a renowned and larger agency brings in greater resources, it often loses you the people hours and dedication that a smaller agency like Sprague Media brings to the table.

Boasting 654% ROI in 3-months for a pest control client, it’s evident that Sprague Media knows how to get results on even small budgets. Their process is modeled on larger agencies that have been around for decades – they start by spreading brand awareness, they engage your target audience, and then finally they make the “ask” or sell.

Based out of Portland, Sprague Media is entirely focused on digital paid advertising. This focus gives them the ability to become complete experts in their craft, while other agencies offering a broad range of services often struggle to offer any at a world-class level.

Pros

  • Complete focus on paid advertising
  • Small and nimble team
  • Proven results

Cons

  • Lack the resources of larger agencies
  • Less dedicated admin and account staff

Conclusion

Digital advertising is quickly becoming the most important method of marketing for companies both small and large. Google AdWords is leading that charge, but Facebook is close behind, and with an unmatched ability to target specific audiences with detailed specifications, Facebook is the ideal advertising channel.

Finding the right agency to manage your Facebook advertising campaign isn’t simple, but it is extraordinarily important. Choosing the wrong team could cost you time and money, which is why we’ve specifically recommended five companies that have generated proven results for their clients at a reasonable cost.

How To Advertise on Facebook

If you are thinking of online advertising, then there is no better way of advertising than Facebook advertising. Research conducted by eMarketer found out that more than 95% of social media marketers consider Facebook as the most efficient social media marketing platform. This huge love for Facebook as an advertising platform is because it allows business to target their campaigns efficiently. It doesn’t discriminate growing business from established businesses. A few hundred dollars is enough to generate a significant amount of traffic. It is also an easy to learn platform and most advertisements are incredibly customizable and flexible.

Aside from that, Facebook has a massive following of more than 2.2 billion users cutting across all age groups. What’s more, Facebook has a micro-targeting feature that allows you to reach your target audience based on their behaviors, location, demographics or even interests. So advertising with Facebook ensures you reach an audience that is more likely to purchase your products and services making it the most efficient advertising platform.

Now that you have a heads up on the effectiveness of Facebook advertising, you are now ready to try it out. Here is a complete guide to Facebook advertising. The guide aims to equip you with Facebook advertising knowledge and take you through your first Facebook ad strategies

Types of Facebook Ads

Depending on the ad you would like to post, Facebook allows you to post a range of products or services in a single ad. Some of the ads that could be helpful include:

Carousel ads (multi-purpose ads)

A carousel ad is an ad format that allows you to show up to ten videos and images, calls to action, links and headlines in a single ad unit. It is beneficial for e-commerce advertisers that seek to promote a range of products forms their store.

This kind of ad is supported on mobile newsfeeds, desktop newsfeeds, Instagram and audience network. Some of its specs include:

  • A link description of 30 characters
  • A headline of 5 characters
  • An ad copy text of 90 characters
  • A recommended image size of 600 by 600 or 1080 by 1080 pixels

Dynamic product ads (DPA)

Facebook’s DPA is similar to remarketing display ads on steroids. They target users based on inactions of past actions on your application or website with a well-planned Ad. All you need to do is to upload a product catalog on Facebook and ensure that your Facebook pixel is correctly installed on your website’s pages. Facebook will do the re-targeting and remarketing.
DPA is supported by mobile newsfeed, desktop newsfeed, Instagram, audience network, and right column.
Some of its specs include:

  • A link description of around 30 characters
  • A headline of 25 characters
  • An ad copy text of 90 characters
  • A recommended image size of 600 by 600 or 1200 by 628 pixels

Facebook lead Ads

Leads are the perfect way to advertise on Facebook. This type of Facebook Ad allows your audience to sign up or download your content, without leaving the Facebook page. This makes the lead ads an ideal method for getting a potential customer’s email easily. Facebook lead ads are supported by mobile newsfeed, desktop newsfeed, audience newsfeed, and Instagram.

Some of its specs include:

  • A website URL and a privacy policy
  • A context card button of about 30 characters
  • A context card headline of about 60 characters the context card can be in paragraph format that has no bullet point format or character limit that allows a maximum of 80 characters per bullet
  • A link description of about 30 characters
  • An ad copy text of about 90 characters
  • A headline of about 25 characters
  • A recommended image size of 1200 by 628 pixels

Once a user fills in the form, Facebook stores their email addresses on your Facebook ads account. You now have to move these new leads tour CRM system. The easiest way to do this is to automate the whole process. You can do this by setting up your campaigns using AdEspresso.

Canvas ads

A canvas Ad is an engaging ad that allows users to interact with content on Facebook. It is currently available only on mobile newsfeed because we tend to interact more with mobile devices. With canvas, your target audience is able to swipe through a carousel of images, tilt the images in different directions, or zoom in and out by moving their fingertips. An advantage of a canvas ad is that it loads ten times faster than normal mobile web applications.
Some of its specs include:

  • A headline of about 45 characters
  • An Ad copy text of about 90characters
  • A recommended image size 1200 by 628 pixels
  • A canvas Ad has the following components
  • An auto-play video
  • A text block
  • A header with logo
  • A button for offside links
  • A product set
  • An image carousel

Collection Ad

A collection as showcases a variety of products being sold on your website. it makes it easier for users to browse, discover and purchase products or services in an immersive and visual way. It is also supported only by mobile newsfeed It has specs like

  • A recommended headline of about 25 characters
    doesn’t support images within more than 20% text
  • The image ratio is 1:9:1
  • The image size is 1200 by 628 pixels

Single Video Ads

Single videos as the name suggests are ads that contain a single video. Almost 50% of Facebook users prefer watching about an hour of Facebook videos per week, so it proves to be one of the most efficient Facebook ads. Also, a majority of the audience prefer videos without sound, so you can use captions rather than sounds. A preferable video ad length should be about 30 seconds but shouldn’t be longer than 60 seconds.
Some of its specs include:

  • a maximum file size of 2.3 GB
  • a resolution of at least 720P
  • an aspect ratio of 16:9
  • a video format of MP4 or MOV

Now that you have the basics of the Facebook ad types, you want to put this into practice. If you are advertising on Facebook for the first time have no worries, here is a complete guide that would help you do just that.

A step by step guide to Facebook advertising

Step 1: Choose the main goal

Different businesses have different goals when it comes to advertising. You only need to identify your business with the type of goal you would like to achieve. Facebook offers eleven different marketing goals based on what you want your ad to achieve. But first, you need to log in to Facebook ads manager, then select campaigns tab and click on create. After this, you will have to select one of the 11 different business goals. They include:

1. Lead generation – get new leads from your target audience
2. Video views – get your video to be watched by more users
3. App installs – get Facebook users to install your app
4. engagement – get to a significant number of users that aims to increase an attendance at your event, encourage people to claim an offer or increase the number of page likes or posts
5. Reach – expose your ad to as many people users as possible
6. Brand awareness – get your new brand to reach a new audience
7. Store visits – get your target customers to visit your nearby store
8. Catalog sales – link your Facebook ad to your catalog product to show your audience ads of products they are most likely to buy
9. Conversions – encourage people to take a particular action on your website like buying your product or subscribing to your list.
10. Messages get your audience to contact you via Facebook messenger
11. Traffic – drive a traffic to a particular app or webpage
You can choose an ad objective based on the above goals for your specific ad. Remember that if you plan to use exposure objectives, you can pay per impressions, but for conversion-based objectives like sales, you can pay per action

Step 2:  Name your campaign

After you have come up with an objective, scroll down on your Facebook ad campaign and select whether to use an A/B split test. A/B testing is a marketing strategy that includes small tests on a fraction of your campaign before committing fully to the campaign. You also have the option of choosing whether to turn on budget optimization. This method can be powerful when you are using several ad sets. But since you are a beginner, you can focus on single ads first.
In the engagement objective, you may choose whether to focus on event responses, page likes or post engagement. After you have decided on the focus, click set up ad account to continue.

Step 3: Set up your ad account

This step is imaginary if you have already set up your account. So will go straight to your target audience. But if you are a new Facebook advertiser, you will have to enter a few important account details here. Some of the details may include, your country, time zone, and your preferred currency. After you have finished you can click on continue.

This step is very essential and it is important that you choose your details wisely. It is difficult to change these details thereafter and you might be forced to set up a new account.

Step 4: Target your audience

After you have clicked on continue, you will be directed to a different page where you will be required to name your Facebook ad campaign and select what page you wish to promote. Scroll down to start building a target audience for your ads. The first option is to add a custom audience of people that have interacted with your business before, be it on Facebook or off Facebook.

You will be required to select your target location, language, gender, and age. There is audience size indicator on the right that gives you a sense on the potential ad reach, make good use of the audience size indicator.

After you have selected our target audience, you need to filter them to ensure you remain with an audience that is most likely to purchase your product or services. Remember, an effective targeting is important in maximizing return on investments (ROI). There are two ways you can ensure that your audience is as specific as possible:

Connection – you can exclude or target users that have an existing connection to your event, app, or a page you manage. For instance, if you want to target a new audience, you would select “exclude people that have already liked your page”. If you want to promote a new product or an offer to an existing audience, you would select “people that have already liked your page” so as to reach users that have already liked your page.”

Detailed targeting – you can use this field to include or exclude people based behaviors, interests and demographics. This option allows you to be as specific as possible. For example, you can choose to target an audience that interested in both yoga and meditation while also excluding an audience that is interested in hot yoga.

Step 5: Choose where your ad will appear

How your ad appears on Facebook is important. If you are new to Facebook, the easiest way to do this is by using automatic placements. When you select this option, Facebook automatically places your ad across the audience network, messenger, Instagram, and Facebook depending on the best place to get good results.

After you’ve gained more experience, you can decide to place your ad in a specific location based on where you are likely to get more traffic. You have a few options that include:
Operating systems and mobile devices – Android, IOS or both
Platform – audience network, messenger, Instagram, or Facebook with a few subsections within each category like stories, right column or newsfeed.

Step 6: Set your schedule and budget

You need to decide the cost you are willing to incur on the Facebook paid ads. Facebook paid ads has two options, daily or lifetime budget. Select either of them then click on set start and end dates if you want to schedule your ad In the future or choose to automate it immediately. There’s an advanced budget option if you want to get finer details of how you spend your money. Note that using a schedule when running your paid advertisement is the most effective way to spend your ad budget. Scheduled advertisement allows you to choose only the ad your target audience is most likely to interact with. After you have made your selections, you can click on continue.

Create your ad

When creating your ad, you need to choose the media components and the texts you wish to include in your ad. The available formats vary based on the objective of your campaign at the beginning of the process.

There is a preview tool at the bottom of the page that you can use to test your ad and ensures it looks good for all your potential placements, be it on the right column, the desktop newsfeeds or the mobile newsfeeds. When you are satisfied with your choices, click on the confirm button to submit your order. You will receive an email from Facebook notifying you that your AD has been approved and will be posted soon on Facebook.

Advertising tips on Facebook

Advertising on Facebook especially if you are new to Facebook ads can be a daunting task. You need a few strategies to ensure that your ad is as effective as possible. Here are a few of the strategies that could be beneficial.

Use audience targeting

A good way to starting on Facebook ads is by using a small audience then broaden it gradually as you gain experience with Facebook ads. For instance, if you are advertising a new brand of wine, you could start by using a specific location that you know target wines. After a few weeks you can broaden to wine tasting, then food and wine and so on. This is a good strategy for expanding your target audience and ensure it affects your results positively.

Audience targeting can also be used to create several ads for groups related to varying business objectives. With audience target, you can relate to existing customers differently than you would have with new customers. If you have a local business and seeking to target audience within your location, you can use postal code or zip code. This is especially helpful if you know of a neighborhood that converts traffic well.

Use Facebook pixels

A Facebook pixel is a small piece of code that may have a huge impact on your Facebook ad campaign. This code allows you to track conversions, create lookalike audience and remarket your product to people that have viewed the product on your website.

Facebook pixel is an essential tool, even if you don’t have plans to use it currently it might be beneficial in the future so it is important that you have it installed. This way, you will have to remarket and tracking data ready to implement when you want to start Facebook optimization.

Use quality videos and photos

Facebook users dislike blurry, or pixelated photos and jumpy videos. The words may be catchy but without a quality video or photo, you have lost it already. You visuals are what grabs your audience attention and create a good impression.

Ensure you have tested everything

Ignorance can be really costly. Making assumptions on what might work and what might not work can really cost your business. Every time you place an ad on Facebook, you need to test it against the previous ads you posts to check if there is any improvement you are making. Currently, technology is evolving, and if you keep relying on the previous ads on Facebook, you might fail terribly. Therefore the only way to stay relevant is to keep testing every ad you post on Facebook.

Optimize and track performance

Check how your ads are performing constantly in the ads manager dashboard. If you find an ad that isn’t performing to your expectation, take it out and invest in an ad that is performing. There are tools that will help you manage this. One of the common resourceful tools is the adsensepro. The adsensepro can create, manage, and optimize your ad. If you have a larger firm, then the Hootsuite would be perfect for you. From the dashboard that you use to monitor your ads, you can test and create lots of Facebook ads in a few minutes. It has an easy to understand analytics that uncovers you best ad fast.

How do you get Facebook ad ideas?

Now that you have all the tools ad essentials to create your ad, the challenge comes in on how your ad will be or how it will look like. If you have this problem, then have a look at the following strategies

1. Convert every piece of content to an ad

Every brand has its own content that drives most of the traffic every month. You can adapt this piece of content to an ad and get a perfect way to advertise using it in form of a video ad or a photo ad. To create a video ad, there are several ways you can convey the key contents in your ad through short text image. You then can use a few social video tools to compile them into a video in Facebook ad manager.

2. Drive direct sales

If your brand is well known to provide good quality products, you have every reason to generate direct sales from these products and services. For instance, if you are planning on introducing a new product in the market and your previous products were received well, you can use the Facebook ad to target the same audience that purchased your previous products. You can also reach out to a new audience by using lookalike audiences to reach the audience that is more likely to purchase your product or service. This strategy could earn you nearly a million users in traffic and could generate more sales.

3. Strategize on offline lead generation

Facebook shouldn’t be your only source of traffic. Focus on other sources like offline purchases. You can use engagement objective to drive traffic to an offline event and use the lead generation technique to get them to your dealership or store to experience the products and services you are providing. You can do this through a test drive.

Facebook allows you to track offline conversions so that you have an understanding of how effective ads are in driving offline sales. You can also use a tracking data to develop custom audiences of users that interact with your products offline so that you can effectively target them in the future.

How do you improve Facebook ad conversions?

Conversions rates are one of the most targeted metrics by social media marketers. Conversion rates are a top priority for most marketers. A good conversion is one that is capable of bringing in more success this delivering a strong ROI. Conversions are not only used to drive purchases but also drive actions. The main aim of an ad campaign is to increase the number of shoppers or the number of subscribers to their websites. Given the benefits of ad conversions, you might want ways to improve your ad conversions. Here is how you go about it:

1. Define your conversion event

Before converting any traffic, you might want to know the actions people take after viewing your ad on Facebook. There are a few types of conversions that Facebook supports. They include: purchase, initiate checkout, add to wishlist, and view content. Your ad can’t serve all the conversion goals, so you need to create an ad for each goal. Consider where the goals fit into the journey of the customer and convert this appropriately.

2. Prioritize on your destination

An ad should be as good as its landing page when determining where you would want the conversion to take place, ensure everything is in order for you to deliver the promises of your ad. The steps below could help you achieve this:

Optimize for apps – a significant number f people prefer purchasing via mobile so it would be important that you utilize this to drive people to your app. So ensure you have registered your app and integrated it with Facebook SDK.

Aim for continuity – if you focused your ad on a specific objective, ensure your landing page delivers just that. Don’t get your visitors frustrated by mixing up things. If for instance, your ad focuses on shoes, ensure your landing page also focuses on shoes. Anything else will lead to the potential visitor being frustrated therefore you would have lost an essential lead. Language and design are important here also.

Implement pixel – after you have decided on the page you would like the conversion event to happen, you will have to add the ace pixel code to the page to track events. With this, you can determine what ad performs better and what doesn’t perform. This way you can focus on ads that perform and leave out those that don’t.

3. Create an attractive visual

The impression of the user determines their interactions with your ad. It just a matter of seconds for a user to determine where to land. So it is important that you create an ad that is very attractive if you want to convert more leads. Most first impressions are brought by the design so ensure your visuals are as good as possible.

Use videos or GIFs – opt for shorter interesting videos. If possible use static videos. Ensure you have tested these videos for mobile devices to ensure they are supported by every device.
Size-to-spec – low-resolution videos reflect poorly on your ad. Ensure you have the right image size to meet the right size specifications.

Do not overload images with text – it is recommended that you use texts sparingly on images. If you have to use texts in your image, use facebook’s image text check to check the right size of text to include.

4. Crisp copy should be short and sweet

A string ad is usually characterized by crisp copy. Therefore ensure that the copy is interesting and short a well.

Keep it short – a lot of text can intimidate your audience. Therefore focus on what is important and leave out the rest.

Avoid jargon – use a language your audience can understand.

Get personal – use personal pronouns like you to suggest a relationship between your brand and the audience.

5. Use a direct call to action

A strong call to action is essential since conversions are all about motivational actions. You can use strong verbs like explore, discover, start, find if you aim at educating your audience about your organization. If you aim at driving subscriptions or purchases, be direct with phrases like sign up or buy now.

6. Broaden your audience

Facebook has a target expansion option that is essential in looking for more leads. This option allows Facebook to find more users similar to you have included in the interest target section. This allows you to reach more people as well as driving more conversions at a lower cost per conversion.

7. Track using several devices

Regardless of where you have decided your ad will be placed, you should ensure you track the conversions and clicks from all devices, whether mobile or desktop. Even if you have only put up an ad that runs only on desktop devices. You can install, Facebook SDK on your mobile app that allows Facebook to capture more data based on audience and expand the target of the audience.

8. Use link click optimization
If you feel your campaign is not driving enough leads and conversions within the first few weeks, then your data isn’t delivered the right way. Facebook requires about 50 conversions per ad within the first week too effectively deliver the ad. If your ad has less than 50 conversions in the first week, then you might consider optimizing for link clicks rather than conversions.

Get the most of your Facebook ads with the above guide. This guide has a detailed step by step guide that ensures you follow every step appropriately while also ensuring you put up quality ads that can be accepted by a wide range of Facebook users.

 

Why Google’s Cracking Down On Non Mobile-Friendly Sites And What Attorneys Need To Do

You may have heard whisperings that Google is going to be cracking down on non-mobile-friendly websites starting April 21st.

That’s absolutely correct.

For a while now they’ve been keeping track of whether sites are optimized for small screens and slow data connections. Up until now they haven’t changed any of the rankings based on that information and instead, just show a little “Mobile-friendly” label on search results when searching from your mobile device.

But now, they’re taking the next step, and using mobile-friendly as a ranking signal when someone searches for your firm on a mobile device. We don’t know how much it will affect rankings just yet (but we’re watching closely and will report as soon as we can measure it), but we know that it will drop rankings for searches from mobile devices, and it’s expected to drop them considerably.

What does that mean for you?

Well, it depends on if your site is mobile-optimized. Here’s a link to check if your site is mobile-friendly. If it is, then you should be all set.

But if it’s not, come on back here and we’ll discuss the options you have for avoiding the Google hammer in a few weeks.

So here’s the link to Google’s mobile-friendly tester.

Go check your site and see if Google thinks it’s mobile-friendly. I’ll wait.

How’d you do? Did your site pass?

It passed!

That’s awesome. Gold star for you! You may want to read ahead though to see if one of the other options here might be a better option for you.

It didn’t pass?

Don’t worry all is not lost. Consider this a bit of a wake-up call. After all, you still have a little time to right the ship, so to speak.

First of all, these changes won’t affect your rankings when someone searches for your firm on their desktop. Which, is still somewhere around 75% of search traffic in the US depending on whose stats you use.

But, that still means you’ll start to lose out on 1/4 of your traffic.

A better way to think about this might be to consider the following scenario. Let’s say a potential client just got into a cab when they received an email from a friend referring your firm to fix their problem. The first thing they’ll do is google you or your firm.

If your site isn’t mobile-friendly, your firm website might not be right there in the first spot in their search results. Instead, they might see your Avvo profile (which you may or may not have done anything with). Or maybe they’ll see a complaint a bitter client left on a review site.

All that effort crafting your brand and your message, and it’s all for naught because your site wasn’t the first one listed.

Obviously, that’s not a great place to be in. So it begs the question…

“How do I make my site mobile-friendly?”

Well, you have two options. You can redesign your site, or you can create a separate mobile site that lives at mobile.myfirm.com.

Each has their benefits and drawbacks, but I’m going to strongly recommend a site redesign over creating a separate mobile version of your website.

The main reason is maintenance. With two different web properties to maintain, you’ll need to have a way of keeping them in sync. And what’s more, you’ll need to be diligent about telling Google which version of a page is ‘canonical’. Meaning, which version is the “one true version?” Fail to stay on top of that and Google will dock you for having duplicate content.

The second reason is just common sense. For the same cost it would take to build a mobile-specific site, you could redesign your site to be mobile-friendly and avoid the mess of maintaining two properties altogether.

No need to worry about whether the mobile site matches your desktop branding. No worrying about duplicate content. And hey, you get a fancy new desktop and mobile website for the same investment.

How large is that investment? Well, it depends on what you’re starting with.

I use wordpress or another CMS.

If you already use a content management system like WordPress, it could be as simple as finding a theme you like. A decent responsive theme can be had for peanuts on sites like themeforest.net. You might get lucky and be able to just swap in the new theme and call it a day and you’re done in ~$50.

More likely, you’ll want to find a developer to customize the theme in a few places to fit your brand. That could cost you ~$50-$100/hr for a few hours of work. A far cry from building a new site from scratch.

I had a custom site coded for me.

But if your site was a custom job, as we typically see with agencies or with one-off website designs, your options get a (little) bit more expensive.

You’ll likely need to go through that process again. Which is a pain, I know. This time through though, keep an eye on an ability to upgrade in the future. If you’re working with a developer or agency, make sure they’re using a commonly-used CMS that will be around for a while. WordPress would be my recommendation (outside of using AmazeLaw of course.)

For an idea of what a site should cost these days, check out our guide to How Much a Law Firm Website Should Cost.

But regardless of your starting point. This update is a good thing for your firm. Sure it requires some investment. But that’s exactly what it is. An investment that you’ll most definitely see returns on.

Again. This is a GOOD thing. Think of it this way.

Imagine you had a 20 year old car. It’s worked well for you in the past. Sure, it’s not shiny, but it’s gotten you where you’ve needed to go.

But, a lot has changed in 20 years. Technology has gotten exponentially better. While you might say “I don’t need my car to talk to me,” it’d be hard to argue against the safety, fuel-efficiency, and reliability improvements that have come along with it.

On the road, states incentivize adoption of new technology through car inspections. On the internet, Google is taking on that role by rewarding sites that stay current with better search placement.

So rather than lamenting the fact that it’s become necessary to upgrade your website, you should also feel excited. You can now take advantage of advances in technology that make marketing your firm much easier.

Does your site need a mobile upgrade?

Our sites are all fully-mobile-optimized. If you want to see what mobile magic AmazeLaw can do for your firm…

Schedule a Demo Today

Cheap web design on the side of the road is NOT the way to go.

How Much Should A Law Firm Website Cost?

It can be pretty daunting trying to figure out how much to spend on a law firm website these days.  There are companies charging tens of thousands of dollars and promising the moon, and there’s always your cousin’s friend from college who would do it for a case of beer and a bucket of chicken.

Sometimes it helps to just set some expectations.  Your mileage may vary according to your goals, your geographic region etc, but here are some ballpark figures that will give you a good sense for what you should get for your dollar, and help you figure out just how much you can afford to spend.

So let’s kick this off at the bottom.

Less than $500

The old adage goes, you get what you pay for.  This bucket usually contains either family friend discounts, students doing the work, or your run of the mill website builder like GoDaddy or Wix.

If your goal is just to have a site that you can point people to, and don’t intend to do online marketing, blogging, lead collection etc, this might be the way to go.  Be careful here though.  A lot of times the website builders are loss-leaders for the business.  For example, GoDaddy makes the website builder cheap to get you to do your web, email and domain hosting with them, which often ends up being a more expensive and lower quality offering than going out and getting decent options separately.

For example, I use DNSimple for domain and DNS hosting. I can’t recommend them enough. And for email hosting, $50/year for Google Apps is an absolute steal.

$500 – $1500

This is a tough range.  It’s tough because it’s likely that you could find someone to do the work for the price, but it’s going to be very difficult to judge the quality beforehand.  A developer that’s worth their salt will be able to charge A LOT more than this, so here, you’re typically dealing with local developers that might not be around very long. You want someone that will be around 2 or 3 years from now and who can answer an email at the drop of a hat if there’s a problem.  Now, if you’re willing to take a bit of the management tasks on, you could probably find a very talented international developer on oDesk that could do a great job for this price.

$1500 – $5000

This is what I would consider the sweet spot for most solos.  In this range you can get a good developer to do a basic site that’ll cover the bases for most of you.

When I say “cover the bases” I mean:

  • Uses a nice responsive theme (looks great on mobile devices)
  • Uses a Content Management System like WordPress or Drupal. Avoid hard-coded sites as you’ll need to contact your developer any time you need a change.
  • Has a BUILT-IN blog (I saw a recent post that suggested attorneys should have a separately branded blog. That is such terrible advice that I would consider it dangerous.)
  • Uses best-practices like semantic markup to make your site more easily parseable by search engines.
  • Basic setup with Google (Google Analytics, Google Authorship)
  • Can offer limited tech support for the foreseeable future.
  • A classic looking, basic typographic logo if you don’t have one yet.
  • Redirects from your existing site if you have one. Basically, make sure that anyone linking to your existing site ends up on a relevant page on your new site.  Without this, any SEO clout you’ve built up will disappear.
  • And the ability to walk you through how to do basic edits (like writing blog posts) yourself.

What you likely won’t get at this price point:

  • Custom photography
  • Custom graphic design (the theme you use will be the “web designer”)
  • Custom copy
  • Comprehensive branding

$5000+

Once you go over $5k, the sky really is the limit.  You could get a custom graphic designer to do a completely custom design just for you.  You could get a marketing consultant to do your bidding.  Really, at this price range, it’ll be really confusing because it’ll likely be a much larger to-do.  There might be an law firm SEO consultant or an AdWords consultant.  All of these things can be positives, but it’s easy to get overwhelmed and there’s a lot of sharks at that price point that’ll promise you the world and never deliver.  If you’re spending that kind of money, make sure you get references and demand quantifiable proof that the investment was worth it.  If they’re good, it’ll be more than evident.

Whatever you decide make sure the following:

Make sure that your domain name is registered under an account you can access yourself and that it’s registered TO YOU.  As I mentioned, I really like DNSimple for this.  They’re great people and they make managing domains really simple without some of the spammier upsell practices of companies like GoDaddy.  Also, don’t let your developer own this account.  If he’s out of business in 2 years, you’ll have a really hard time getting control of your domain (if you can at all).

Be wary of SEO sharks that mention link-building or keyword density when pitching SEO services.  SEO is almost entirely based on writing good content that answers questions that people want answered.  There is very little left that can “game” the system.  Anyone that tells you they can get to the first page of Google for something like “DUI attorney Nashville, TN” and doesn’t immediately follow it up with a year-long content strategy is selling you a bag of goods.

Make sure you understand the ins and outs of your Content Management System before you sign off on the project.  If you’re not completely comfortable with the process of updating your practice area pages or writing a blog post, you never will, and that’s the quickest way to make your investment depreciate like an abandoned house.

When in doubt, feel free to ask for help. I see all of the shady stuff targeting my wife’s practice and I want to scream, so I’m happy to share unbiased advice.

I hope that clears up some of the confusion in the space.  If you have any questions, feel free to let me know and I’ll do my best to answer them…

 

Photo Credit: Mario Carvajal used under CC